Wednesday, February 11, 2009

Wish upon a star?? How about a Dragon's egg...

On the grounds of Dongwasa Temple you will find yourself doing a lot of walking, which I am not opposed to. In the states, we could do with doing more and sitting less. In this peaceful area I picked up on another underlying theme of dragons. When my son was much younger, he was into a show called "Dragon Ball Z", which as any good mother would do, I researched this series of martial arts and Japanese animation. The quest was to secure Dragon balls throughout the universe so that you would be able to get any wish. After you collected a certain number to summon the dragon, the dragon was obliged to grant your wish.
Now, what made me think of this piece of trivia...was the dragons that lined the steps with a dragon egg in their mouths.
I had finally asked about the significance of these dragons, which of course the answer was for protection. And then I saw them...in their makeshift dragon's nest. There were three dragon eggs half-way down the steps. Legend has it...if you place a coin on the eggs and touch the eggs, you will be granted your hearts desire.
Of course I bought into the mythology...and placed a 100 won coin on top of each egg...like a game of Jenga..not toppling the stack of coins and touched each 'egg' for good luck. Now, what did I wish for?? Hmm...not sure if I should tell...after all I have come a long way...too far to jinx my dreams.

5 comments:

MsMVNJ said...

new reader...what an interesting place - looking forward to new posts!

Shanna said...

The eggs are fantastic. Like a wishing well. Love the picture. I may be coming to Korea in the next year for a teaching position, you have given me a lot to look forward to.

Marilyn said...

Shanna...Welcome to my blog...glad you are taking the time to read about South Korea. You will have a lot to look forward to with an adventurous spirit.

Thank you MsMVNJ...welcome to my blog.

Thank you both for your kind words.

jenashmen said...

Thats a beautiful place! Interesting culture, too. Who made the statues?

Marilyn said...

This temple was established in 493 during the Silia Dynasty by Geuldahwasang (a Buddist monk). Since that time, it continues to be restored over the course of many centuries...